Skip to main content

Codemotion Milan 2016: thoughts

I have never written a review on a conference and this isn't one: this is a brain dump (hence the lack of form and structure) that I quite simply needed to get out here. It might be incomplete, biased or what else: if there is anything that I should know then let me know in the comments. If you think I'm wrong then let me know that too, but please elaborate :-).

Last week I was, for the first time, at Codemotion in Milan. A first time doubly so: I had never been to a generalist conference before. Being I a generalist person I appreciated the format, even though I found some of the technical talks too light on actual details.

The talks that I liked the most were those of the inspirational track. I went to these two among others and I heartly recommend that you watch them (heck, have all your team watch them!). Maybe because I'm old and I have recently realized that people matter more than tools or technologies?
Overall I would rate the conference an 8 out of 10 just for those two.

Codemotion is a BIG conference, I think there were around 2000 attendees so rooms get crowded quickly, especially for keynotes or popular talks. Sometimes you might not even make into the room if you're just a minute late because, you know, you might want to talk someone or the speaker.

Food pretty much sucked in a big way. Coffee was not great and my suggestion is that they do without the human pouring it in the small plastic espresso cup next time.
Only nice thing was the fruit salad in the afternoon. Other than that, I pretty much recommend you consider bringing your own food.

Another thing that I did not like was the VIP room for speakers. Seriously? This is a conference and at conferences you meet people, not split them in two groups. On this theme a big shoutout to the awesome lastminute.com team that went to great lengths to answer all my technical questions at their booth. Tip of the hat, boys!

There was a small panel dedicated to job offers, but it was not exciting at all, to the point that it was discussed (or mocked, your call) on reddit.

Things I wish I'd asked

Perhaps I'll get a reply here :-)

To Alaina Percival: any advice for (worried) fathers that wish their daughter played with Legos (and pursued a career in Engineering) rather than Barbies?

To Leo: in his talk he mentioned a slide showing a declining rate of innovation since the 1950s. What do you think is the role of patents in this decline.

To Sven Peters: I know what's culture! (raised hand) It's what's left after you forget all the rules.

Thanks for reading.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Indexing Apache access logs with ELK (Elasticsearch+Logstash+Kibana)

Who said that grepping Apache logs has to be boring?

The truth is that, as Enteprise applications move to the browser too, Apache access logs are a gold mine, it does not matter what your role is: developer, support or sysadmin. If you are not mining them you are most likely missing out a ton of information and, probably, making the wrong decisions.
ELK (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana) is a terrific, Open Source stack for visually analyzing Apache (or nginx) logs (but also any other timestamped data).

From 0 to ZFS replication in 5m with syncoid

The ZFS filesystem has many features that once you try them you can never go back. One of the lesser known is probably the support for replicating a zfs filesystem by sending the changes over the network with zfs send/receive.
Technically the filesystem changes don't even need to be sent over a network: you could as well dump them on a removable disk, then receive  from the same removable disk.

A not so short guide to ZFS on Linux

Updated Oct 16 2013: shadow copies, memory settings and links for further learning.
Updated Nov 15 2013: shadow copies example, samba tuning.

Unless you've been living under a rock you should have by now heard many stories about how awesome ZFS is and the many ways it can help with saving your bacon.

The downside is that ZFS is not available (natively) for Linux because the CDDL license under which it is released is incompatible with the GPL. Assuming you are not interested in converting to one of the many Illumos distributions or FreeBSD this guide might serve you as a starting point if you are attracted  by ZFS features but are reluctant to try it out on production systems.

Basically in this post I note down both the tought process and the actual commands for implementing a fileserver for a small office. The fileserver will run as a virtual machine in a large ESXi host and use ZFS as the filesystem for shared data.