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Migration from samba2.2+ldap to samba3+ldap

I am busy (while customers are away, getting unseasonably tanned) upgrading a linux cluster currently acting as file server to samba3 and ldap 2.2.
On the first day I was lucky:
  • the server won't see the new 140GB disks, only 80GB and for this I had to flash the raid controller (Adapted 2100s)
  • the server won't boot from cd and I had to reset bios settings to default
  • a DDS4 (boasting 20GB native capacity) drive is not able to backup a 15GB partition
One day completely lost and looks like my holidays are shrinking...

UPDATE: just to make sure that things go as wrong as possible somebody planned to rearrange the power supplies while I was plugging the new disks on the second system. Another hour wasted...

3 Jan 2005, Update: all users came back to their offices and I must say that I was a little worried. The system was not really ready in my opinion, but luckily all went well. Only three of them were locked out because of the password being lost in the migration.
All's well what ends well...

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